Take a look at the sentence again:

Clarence couldn't believe that the hardware store was selling garden rakes for only $1.99 each when he brought home twenty of them, his wife Marie just shook her head and squeezed them into a garage stuffed full of her husband's other "good buys."

For a sentence to be a comma splice, you must have two complete sentences joined with a comma. In the example above, no such comma exists. Clarence couldn't believe … begins one sentence. When he brought home twenty of them, his wife Marie just shook her head … starts the second sentence. Because only empty space exists between the two sentences, you should call this error a fused sentence.

Remember that both comma splices and fused sentences are major errors. They make your reader think that you cannot write a correct sentence. Because the sentence is the most basic building block of a piece of writing, comma splices and fused sentences make you look like an amateur!

To fix the problem above, you could put a period after each and begin when with a capital W.

Go to the next sentence.

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